The next day…

I was so excited by the end result of 5047, that I  transferred the planned changes immediately and cut a new version.  This time my fabric is a cotton lawn purchased this year from Fabricmartfabrics.com.  I’ve been drooling over it and several other pieces, but so feared ruining yet another lovely fabric I haven’t been able to cut.

I timed the construction process. I know my final time is less than future versions of this blouse because I made all the pattern changes but didn’t include that time and I didn’t stop for fitting. Normally, I leave a 5/8″ SA on the side seams. I’ll baste  side seams then check fit, sleeve length etc. I tweak fit, then serge the side seams and hem the garment.  Didn’t do that. Fitting usually adds 15 minutes even if I don’t make any changes.  I started the clock with the pressing of the fabric and didn’t pause for anything. Finished time?  2hr 15 min from pressing to photographs.

Despite the lack of smile, I’m as happy with this version as the last. Happier even. Making the shoulder seams 5/8″ brought the sleeve into place and the neckline up to a more comfortable level. The effect of such such small adjustments is amazing.

Do you remember me writing yesterday that fabric can reveal a good pattern’s faults?  Here’s one example.  Yesterday’s rayon barely puckered at the bust line. Today’s cotton lawn shows a s drape below the bust.  Also the front swings out a bit whereas rayon drops straight down wanting to cling closer to the body. Will I change the pattern for these two?

I added shoulder pads.  The rayon looks so much better, I decided the lawn needed shoulder pads too.  I’m pretty sure I need two thickness of shoulder pads. My right shoulder is just enough lower than the left that I can see it and understand it is the cause of the drag lines on that side. Alternatively, I could make unique right and a left shoulder slopes. But this isn’t a problem I’m ready to tackle.  Besides, most people will think it’s just the way I’m standing.

Instead of washers, I’m using a small silver chain in my hem.

I added fusible interfacing to the hem, then serge finished the raw edge.  I knew I wanted to use my machine blind hem so I fused half-inch steam-a-seam just below the line of serging. Next I secured the ends of the chain in the side seams. I only put chain in the back hem.  That’s the hem that creeps up and sticks to my upper hip. Besides this chain isn’t terribly expensive (purchased from CreateForLess.com on a card without findings), if it is the solution or even just a great help, it will be an additional step and an added expense for each top.

Once the chain is secured, I turned up the hem and keeping the chain below the SAS, pressed the hem into place

Then I hemmed it at the machine.  Time will tell if this is the answer to velcro butt and if I need more care when inserting the chain.

*******************

Summery Pattern Alterations

  • Front Overlap
    Increase to 1.25″
  • Seam allowances
    • 1/4″
      • shoulder
      • neck
      • collar
      • sleeve
      • center front
    • 5/8″ SA
      • side seams
    • 1.25″
      • Hem
      • Cuff

 

  • Back
    • -1″BWL
    • +1″ length  at hem
    • Shoulder slope – copy from 1201
    • Armscye copy from original
  • Front
    • -1 BWL
    • Hem wedge lengthen 3.5″ at CF 1″ at SS
    • Shoulder slope – copy from 1201
    • Armscye copy from original
  • Sleeve
    • Lengthen to 21″
    • Wrist 14″ wide

5047 Camp Shirt: The Reveal

My fabric is a Rayon Challis purchased from Fashion Fabrics after much self debate. Debate as in add to cart. Delete from cart. Add to cart. Delete….    I love Rayon Challis for blouses.  It wears like a dream. Drapes beautifully without revealing all the curves.  Sews easily; doesn’t ravel badly.  Its greatest downfall is that it shrinks with every laundry cycle. Most blouses I make of Rayon Challis survive between 1 and 2 years then must be replaced. This particular challis was bright. Individually, I liked warm yellow, bright turquoise and kelly green.  But altogether they didn’t feel like me. Except that I’m changing. Yes you can still change even with 6 decades under your belt. In my case I’m wearing blouses all year round. Especially printed versions they tie together a clothing collection beautifully. A new combination such as this, will freshen my wardrobe while making use of existing garments. In the winter, I layer blouses with vests (on top) or camisoles beneath.  In the summer, well fall and spring too, blouses become jackets to be worn over short or sleeveless tops.  Blouses have become a welcome staple that add comfort, coordination  and color to my wardrobe. It’s quite a change from suits and subtle tops worn most my career. I finally purchased this fabric because I knew I’d only live with it for a couple of years and  if it was really bad IRL, it would make a good muslin.

Putting it together construction was straight forward. Not terribly difficult but then I’ve made a thousand camp shirts. This pattern, even with all my changes, went together as well or better than most.

I did not stitch the front and back darts.  I wanted the boxy, blousy, casual  look of a camp shirt. This time, anyway. I think I only made one mistake.  I serged the shoulders together with a 1/4″ SA.  It should have been 5/8″.  I should have serged off 3/8″ height at the shoulder.  Since I didn’t, my blouse is a little lower than I would prefer. But not so low that I want to rip out the shoulder seams.

I had a problem choosing buttons.  None of my red, green or yellow buttons would work. They were the wrong shade; the wrong size or too few (I needed/wanted 5 or 6).  I settled upon the 5 blue buttons shown. Attaching them I discovered  one was slightly smaller than the other 4.  I put the smaller one at the top.  The theory is: if you can’t camouflage the problem, make it feature. I attached the buttons with matching (nearly) blue thread but I made the buttonholes and top stitching  in green.  No good reason. I just liked it.

Still a little wrinkle at the bust, but no big U’s. Hem is level. Yipee!

Notice, there are no U’s on my side.  I’m really happy about this because it means that copying the shoulder from 1201 and adding the original armscye solves those drag lines (which I refer to as U’s/drapes/curtain swags). I’m even more pleased because this could be the solution I need for my Louise Cutting and Loes Hinse patterns i.e. (1) change the shoulder slope to my shoulder (2)  redraw the original armscye. It’s a two-step process  I’m happy to make.  If this is the solution I’m looking for, I may be able to find a more elegant one-step solution.  Usually, I have to work at these things for a while but the end result is ideal.

I also like the side seam vents. They are purely decorative.  Louise Cutting often includes side seam vents but they serve a fit purpose in her draft.  I’m happy that they are decorative because it means I can stitch straight down eliminating the vent without creating fit issues.  While I don’t think a number of design features (pockets, vents etch)  are needed to make a shirt a camp shirt, I do like to add variety with details. A few easy changes can make it look like I’m using a new pattern when in truth I’m being creative with an old favorite.

No Shoulder Pad —– Shoulder Pad

 

I took pics without shoulder pads; slipped them into place and took another series of pics. Shoulder pads seems like overkill in a soft casual blouse, but I like the end result.  I think the blouse drapes better and this especially show up in the back view.  I’ve added 5 small flat washers in the back hem.  I nearly always have a problem with Velcro butt.  I’m experimenting with small chain (like Channel utilized with jackets but finer) and light weight flat washers.  The bulk of a chain would be unnoticeable in a jacket.  I’m not so sure that will be true with a blouse. With both the chain and washers, I’m concerned about adding items that won’t rust or otherwise damage my garment.  Once this pattern is fit, I can sew a camp shirt from start to finish (providing I’ve not decided to do something creative) in under 4 hours.  But even with that little time invested, I don’t want to do something I know will ruin my garment. OTOH, I’m tired of this issue.  I’d like to find a permanent fix.

It’s summer now. The heat can be oppressive. Yet I’ll get into doctors’ offices and into the freezer section of the grocery store and be thoroughly chilled.  I’ve even had to leave without needed groceries because I couldn’t stand the cold. Typical use during the summer will be more like this:

After I started sewing, I noted an odd thing  about the pattern. The front over lap is drafted to finish at  3/8″. It’s drafted for 3/4″ with a 3/8″ seam allowance that means the overlap will finish at 3/8″.  I prefer a wider overlap. Perhaps I did something wrong, but I think I’ll widen the overlap a half-inch to suit my personal preference

I’m hoping this pattern works as well with cotton, cotton-poly or other fabrics I might choose (I have some lovely silks in mind).  Rayon has a wonderful drape that can make a good pattern look great while other fabrics will reveal a good pattern’s short comings.  More importantly, I’m really hoping that through Conni’s fitting procedure I’ve discovered the new-to-me alterations needed to make my garments look their best no matter who the pattern cutter is.

*****************************************************************

Planned Pattern Alterations

  • Front Overlap
    Increase to 1.25″
  • Seam allowances
    • 1/4″
      • shoulder
      • neck
      • collar
      • sleeve
      • center front
    • 5/8″ SA
      • side seams
    • 1.25″
      • Hem
      • Cuff

Summary Pattern Alterations

Include the above plus

  • Back
    • -1″BWL
    • +1″ length  at hem
    • Shoulder slope – copy from 1201
    • Armscye copy from original
  • Front
    • -1 BWL
    • Hem wedge lengthen 3.5″ at CF 1″ at SS
    • Shoulder slope – copy from 1201
    • Armscye copy from original
  • Sleeve
    • Lengthen to 21″
    • Wrist 14″ wide

 

 

 

5047 Camp Shirt: Pattern Alterations

I pulled out 5047’s shirt tissue pieces. Examined them carefully and compared with both my basic block CS1201 and the beloved Otto Vintage blouse (which unfortunately no longer fits either.)  5047 is drafted with  front and back vertical darts and hem vents. Otherwise it looks very much like the camp shirt I envision including the slightly longer shoulder and slightly (1″) flattened sleeve cap.

I traced the XL  except for the front facing. I knew I had several alterations to make some of which would affect the facing. It’s easier to IMO to make alterations to the front and then copy the front for the facing than it is to trace the facing and make all the alterations twice and then true the facing with the bodice front.    Immediately after tracing, I shortened the back waist length 1″ on both front and back. At the hem, I added an even 1″ to the length of the back because I like my blouses a little longer than Conni drafts and that’s a difference between 5047 and my block 1201.  To the front hem, I added more of a wedge.  It is 3.5″ at the center front but only 1″ at the side seam.  I used the curve to join these two points, again details from my block 1201.  I copied the shoulder curve from  my block (1201).

Now something I didn’t mention before.  When I traced the front and back pattern pieces, I traced their armscyes a second time.  Once the new shoulder slope was drawn, I lined up the original  armscye shoulder point to shoulder point, side seam to side seam. In effect, I am adding the original drafted armscye back to the altered front and back.  There’s no need to walk the seams or adjust the sleeve cap because I’ve just made sure that the sleeve as drafted will fit the armscye.  But I’m taking a chance that the armscye will work with my body.  This is one fit-area I’ve worked with several times and can’t claim 100% success. Besides, I prefer an elegant solution.  My corrective attempts have been anything but. (Elegant that is.)

The 5047 comes with a quarter sleeve. I wear quarter sleeves for short periods each year.  I’m either cold and want covering; or I’m hot and want uncovering. I’m wearing the same quarter sleeve T-shirts that I made/purchased 8 years ago. They just don’t get worn much and don’t wear out. Point is, I wanted a long sleeve. I traced the sleeve then compared it with sleeve from the Vintage blouse. The Vintage blouse no longer fits, but the sleeve is still the right length.  Comparing the sleeves shows me that the 5047 is about 1″ shorter than sleeve from the Vintage Blouse. Knowing that the 0547 sleeve cap is flattened, I aligned the underarms of the two patterns and made the 0547 that long. I also made the wrist of my 5047 14″ wide, same as my Vintage blouse.  Because I’ve already adapted the Vintage Blouse for several styles (cuffed, gathered, etc) I think that 14″ might  be too wide for a straight sleeve. But I prefer to start with it too wide and narrow a bit.  I’m hoping to make a basic that I can refer to and even outright copy to future patterns.  I desperately need TNT’s. All this fitting eats up sewing and creative time.

 

Summary of Pattern Alterations:

  • Back
    • -1″BWL
    • +1″ length  at hem
    • Shoulder slope – copy from 1201
    • Armscye copy from original
  • Front
    • -1 BWL
    • Hem wedge lengthen 3.5″ at CF 1″ at SS
    • Shoulder slope – copy from 1201
    • Armscye copy from original
  • Sleeve
    • Lengthen to 21″
    • Wrist 14″ wide

 

 

 

 

Connie Crawford 5047

Yes the love affair is over–in that I know Connie’s patterns will not fit me straight out of the envelope. But I think they may still be useful.  Many are classic styles. Many are classics that are updated with current fit and RTW sizing.  I especially like that I do not need to make narrow shoulder or hollow chest adjustments.  Unlike Burda patterns, I’m not  fixing too-wide or too deep necklines. Had I not followed her fitting order, I would never have understood how important the shoulder slope is. Following through on that, I’ve realized that the width, depth and shape of the armscye and sleeve cap are also critical to fit for my body.  In a way, I’m disappointed that there is not a wider selection of Conni Crawford patterns.

For several weeks, I’ve been hunting for CC’s camp shirt (CS2112 I think).  It has all the details I envision of when someone says “camp shirt” i.e.

  • Shirt like but
  • Boxy (no darts or side seam shaping)
  • One-piece straight collar (may be curved slightly to fit the neckline but definitely no collar stand of any kind)
  • Cut-on front facing for button/buttonholes (though I often cut the facing as a separate piece to make best use of limited fabric)
  • Straight level hem
  • Loose sleeve which is either quarter or full length.  Somehow a 3/4 or cap sleeve doesn’t fit my vision of “camp”
  • Slightly extended shoulder with corresponding slightly flattened sleeve cap but not to the point of being a drop sleeve

Notice, I don’t think it needs a yoke to be a camp shirt. Nor does it need vents, pockets or innumerable other details which others attach. Those details are  OK. I just think it can be a camp shirt without them. I detest the doubled folded front shirt placket and think that detail takes it out of “camp” and closer to a dress shirt.

I haven’t been able to find the desired pattern. I emailed inquiring as to its availability because it was in the  last catalog.  She responded promptly (thank you Conni) that 2112 had been replaced by another pattern for fit decisions. The pattern she recommends contains both the IMO unneeded yoke and the detested double folded placket. (I don’t know why I hate those, but I do.)   I’ve been watching that E auction site and the other E craft sale site for 2112.  I’ve been purchasing CC patterns that I like (for really cheap prices) but the much desired 2112 has not appeared at all. Not even in a not-my-size version.  I was looking at the jacket in 5047 wondering if it could also be  a blouse when I realized that the secondary shirt looks a whole lot like what I’m wanting in a camp shirt. In the instructions, Conni even calls it a “camp shirt”

 

and so the new adventure begins

*Sadly, my old favorite the camp shirt in Louise Cuttings Easy Ageless Cool  no longer fits.  My attempts at refitting have been frustrating.  I’m unsure what went wrong but I have drag lines and pulls that were never an issue previously. I started trying Conni Crawford patterns hoping that her draft for plus size bodies might have solved the many issues I had with my beloved  Louise Cutting and Loes Hinse patterns. I’m making progress using Conni’s fitting order but I still have issues. 

 

PAS Tweaked 3

I’ve used a very different fabric for this version.  I’m using a silk boucle “suiting” purchased from Joann’s, Ft Collins Co I think back in 2005-2006. It is a lovely light pink with sort of a dusky cast.  I think of it as light rose, but the color companies don’t consult me on color naming. Or anything else for that matter.  Back to my fabric which has a lovely drape. It wants to drape closely to the body. Not cling. Drape.  Unfortunately it has several undesirable characteristics which have landed the last 2 yards in the “muslin” stack. It ravels. Horribly.  I mean you cut the fabric and it ravels. As you stay stitch one side of the neckline, the other ravels and stretches out of shape.  As I’m serge finishing one side, the other is wiggling apart. Sheesh.  I knew  it did this.  I’ve made a shell back in 2005/6 which told me all about the fabric’s bad features. Yet I couldn’t bring myself to throw the fabric away. Couldn’t bring myself to work with it either.  I did attempt to fuse before cutting. It doesn’t want to lie still during the fusing process which creates a permanently  off-grain  fabric. (Insert unhappy face).  Additionally, fusing with the lightest weight interfacing I had at the time, ruined the drape. It just wasnt’ the same fabric. (Two Unhappy Faces.)  To top it all off, the fabric shrinks with every laundering.  I hand laundered in the sink, people and it shrank.

I’m at the stage with the pattern that I don’t need a muslin but I wanted to use an elder fabric and reduce the amount of room this silk was occupying. I worked with it this time by cutting a piece. Rolling it up and taking it directly to the ironing board where I fused tape to all the curved edges. Then I marked the only dart and while barely lifting the fabric from the cutting surface, pinned the dart into place and immediately stitched it.   I’m hoping that using the hand wash cycle, cold water and my front loading washer (bypassing the dryer) will at least give me a few wearings.

I titled this post “tweaks” because I feel I was fine tuning the pattern. Looking at the end result, I don’t think I want to change the pattern any more, but will adapt for individual fabric at fitting.  I trimmed 1/4″ ease from front and back along the center line. I just lined up my ruler along the center front  and slashed off 1/8″. The front seems to be swinging forward, so then I angled the ruler and removed 3/8″ at the hem tapering to nothing just under the bust.  I transferred the 3/4″ lowered armscye to the pattern which makes for a more comfortable armscye without the side U’s:

even when I raise my arm.

Look Ma! No U’s!

Even though I’m pretty sure the side U’s were corrected by achieving a deep enough armscye ; I can’t help but  wonder how much is  also fabric effect.

I accidentally made a lovely hem.

I fused stay tape to keep it from raveling during construction.  Just before hemming, I serged the edge for a clean finish. I applied 1/2″ fusible tape to the wrong side. Turned up along the serged line and fused the hem into place. Although it would seem to be a lot of bulk, it’s really not. I used the overcast stitch along the hem and armscye edges. My Ruby Designer recommended the J foot which has an offset blade.  I bumped the fabric up against the blade and then stitched at a moderately slow speed. The stitch takes 2 forward and 2 to the side.  The second side stitch falls just on the other side of the blade i.e. into air. The foot keeps the fabric flat rather than rolling like a zig zag sitch and Foot B.  I used a size 12 universal needle and increased the stitch length slightly.  I think 3mm but I didn’t write that down so I’m not sure.  The effect is similar to using a wing needle for an heirloom hem.

I’m fairly pleased with the garment and thought these would be the final pics until I saw the back view:

I won’t be making an update to this post or any substantial changes to the garment or pattern.  I will top stitch both front and back facings.  Even though the front facing was easy to flip into place and stayed put during the photo session, I prefer not to fuss with my garments. Top stitching will mean that facing  is never a bother. The back facing obviously (to me) needs a little help.  I thought it was laying smoothly. Apparently not.  I’ll nail top-stitch it into place too. As usual the back is getting hung up on my bum. The fabric has some nap which contributes to the effect. There is plenty of ease and as seen from the side, the back and front hem are level when the back hangs freely.  Since I know this garment is not long for my closet (it’s the fabric that shrinks to non-fitting with the slightest immersion), I choose to experiment with chain or washers in the hem. Both are simple to attach after-the-fact.  It will be easy to remember to check for rusting and take a pic with each wearing to see if the extra weight fixes my velcro-butt issue.

I’m never done with this pattern. Never.  I already have another version ready in a lovely silk Matka on which I plan to add a front placket and buttons. Afterwards, I want to see if any changes to the pattern are needed for knit fabrics. Mind you, I wouldn’t hesitate to use a stable knit.  Wouldn’t give it a thought until fitting. But I think a rayon, ITY  or certainly a slinky knit would benefit from a bit of adjustment. That’s all future plans. My summer weather lasts until about the end of October (sometimes the first few weeks of November).  I’ll have plenty of time to make and share multiple versions.

Circle Jacket in a Sheer Fabric

Read the full post here.

PAS

First 2015 finished PAS:

I should be smiling much wider.  I really like this version but see some tweaks. Isn’t that what all dressmakers do?

although I removed 1/4″ from both sides seams (total of 1/2″ ), the front still looks a little a too big IMO.  The garment should skim the body hinting at shape without revealing all my curves. The pattern has waist shaping at the side seams and a bust dart. The garment should be a little more figure revealing.  I see a single vertical from shoulder to bust on one side.  I’m not sure if that is posture, confirmation that the garment is a bit large or something else. The neckline sits nicely against my chest and back but not at the shoulders.  Again, I’m not sure, is that the new shoulder slope? Is the garment too wide across the shoulders?

I like the back too. I added 1/2″ at the side seams (total 1″ for the back).  this helps it skim the hips but seams to nullify any waist shaping.  It too looks a little wide to me.  I didn’t want to add CF and CB seams, opting instead to enjoy the free-floating effect.

I lowered the armscyes 3/4″ which I think did wonders for the side:

I still have a bit of a U but again that could be because it is still to wide across the shoulders.  The bust dart is correctly positioned. I was afraid that moving the apex would not work. I was afraid that the fabric would ripple or do other funny things.  Definitely relieved that my change worked well .

I’m contemplating changes to the pattern and wondering if I should start fresh.  I will need to narrow the front and back through the shoulder and upper back; reposition bust dart and armscye; add ease to the back hip and remove ease from the front.  It would help if this fabric draped more but this is the kind of fabric I like to use.  I’d really like to have a version of this pattern which works well with this type fabric.I find it often. It’s like canvas. A plain weave with thin yarns rather than fine threads. It is soft and drapes and is comfortable to wear.  It does not cling– well except for my perpetual velcro-butt. It is one of the most comfortable fabrics for summer wear.  It protects from the sun but still is cool to wear. I convinced myself. Developing a pattern for this fabric is a must.

PAS cont

When I’m tired my mind just doesn’t function.  Last night I didn’t know what to do. This morning it was “(slap face) I could have had a V8″

The obvious answer was to address the shoulder slope.  I pulled out CS1201 and compared the shoulders.  CS1201 shoulder ends at about 4″ towards the armscye when placed on top of the PAS.  I traced/marked the slope that far then picked up my curve.  I disagree with Peggy Saggers on several things, but she is a phenom when it comes to utilizing the curve.  I matched the drafted curve of the PAS at the neck and then pivoted the armscye end downwards to align with the traced CS1201 shoulder.

Back to the sewing machine. I hemmed front and back at 5/8″.  I prefer a 1-1/4″ hem but the curve made for a lot of bulk.  I preferred the much smoother 5/8″ hem and so I used it.  I stitched the bust dart using thread in top and bobbin. Then switched to WST in the bobbin to stitch the new shoulder curve and 3.8″ side seams (instead of a 5/8″).

I want to focus on the side view.  I’m so pleased that there are no U’s (or swags or drapes or whatever they are called), drag lines which drape from under bust, across the side seam and up to the back shoulder. I felt underarm tightness and believe the upper bodice drag lines are confirming.  I’m also pleased that the front and back hem appear fairly level. The front may be slightly long. Which makes me think I didn’t have the shoulder seams correctly positioned on my body which could contribute to some of those upper bodice drag lines and the feeling of tightness.  The thing with garment construction is that the same drag line could indicate a few different issues.  It’s up to us, the dressmakers, to understand how the body is effecting the fabric.

The rest of the back drag lines, I’m calling “velcro butt”.  I suffer with this even with the slickest of fabrics.  I’m investigating using fine chains and flat washers.  Both are commonly used is jackets and coats.  Never seen them on dresses or blouses but I’m willing to make history if it helps with my velcro issue.

Oddly my front suddenly looks too big.  I’ve added a mere 1/4″ ease to the front.  I just don’t think it should have made that great a difference from the previous fit.

Happily this gives me direction.  I need to scoop out the underarm.  As I understand it now (initially I didn’t get this fact), the armscye is shortened by the increased slope and must be returned to it’s former depth and shape. I’ll also offset the side seams so that the back retains the ease of the 3/8″ SA but the front benefits from the 5/8″ SA.

…until tomorrow

Pure and Simple Shell

This must be my favorite summer top.  I love the simplicity of design; the fit and easy of sewing.  The extended shoulder is very flattering to my narrow shoulders and wide hip.  Tops made from this pattern cycle quickly through my wardrobe. They are so flattering and therefore often in rotation; and the washing machine and the dryer. Which means they wear out quickly and must be replaced equally quickly. I’m sure I’ve made a hundred of these tops. But only one is currently in my closet; a silk Charmeuse that sees little wear because the fabric is delicate. I need more.

As all my other patterns are needing re-fitting, I’m choosing to approach with the idea that this pattern will need some fitting.  I pulled out my pattern pieces and checked the sizing.  The existing tissue was created from the size recommended by the envelope. I pulled out CS1201 for  comparison. While  not being perfectly fitted, there is enough right about CS1201 to help me making length and circumference decisions.  The existing PAS tissue should be good. I’m a bit anxious though and added 1/2″ to the side seams when cutting out my fabric…

which is a 100% cotton canvas.  I like to think of this as homespun but it really isn’t.  It’s a fabric commonly seen in home dec.  I like it for summer garments because it is opaque but still nice and cool (as in low temperature.)  I have just enough yardage to cut the front, back and neckline facings.

I taped the necklines, shoulders and armscyes thinking that would be enough to keep it from raveling away.  Once again I am hopeful that this pattern which has one nicely fitting garment in my closet, will be nearly perfect.

I stitched the bust darts permanently i.e. 2.5 stitch length poly thread top and bobbin.  I stitched the shoulders and side seams using a 1cm (3/8″) seam allowance. Pressed lightly I want the seams to behave but still be able to change them about) before trying on.  I expected that the seam allowances would need to be 1.5CM (5/8″)  I did not expect the apex of the bust dart to be so low.  I was so astonished, I removed all stitching pressed out the front and back and compared with tissue. The fabric matched the pattern.  Next I went upstairs and tried on the current “nicely fitting” silk Charmeuse copy. How did I miss the bust dart being so far below the bust?

I raised the apex 1″ and drew the lines from side seam to the next apex point.  I’m hoping that fixes the issues on this version.  I can move the entire dart for the next (I’m sure there will be many future versions.)  Then I serged the seams not taped. I love this fabric but just trying it on once has created significant fraying when I want none. I stitched dart, shoulder and side seams all with water-soluble thread and at 5/8″ . .  I hope I’ve fix the issue but the wind has been taken out of my sails and I’m proceeding with even more caution.

So looking at new pics (hoping you can compare with the first set above)

I do think that raising the bust dart was a good idea, but I prefer the ease in the first set of pics which will be simple to fix.  Fabric often hangs up on my hip which makes it difficult to critique the back.   I see the vertical lines from shoulder to armscye both front and back.  I think these are just a fact of the extended sleeve plus maybe a little fabric behavior. The silk charmeuse and a long departed light weight knit are the only versions in which that vertical is not prominent; and that’s in all the versions that I’ve made. I’m most concerned about the U’s under the armscye. Similar lines were present in the  5620, the beloved RAL and any pattern in which the armscye is basically a slit. Armscyes which don’t create those U’s are both long enough and wide enough, they are not slits.  At the moment I’m really not sure what I will do to fix the underarm.   But hey, that’s enough words and pics for one post.  I’ll be back when I can think of something else.

Denim Shorts for Summer

Read my post:  HERE